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bible jesus prayer

Pretenders

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Every society has them, people who learned early that your image is more important than your real character. They care about what people think, and not just any people, but people they don’t even like, people they despise, people to whom they believe themselves superior. So they play a part, pretending to be a good person. They hold a press conference when they donate to charity so everyone knows how generous they are and no one questions how they got their wealth in the first place—by stealing wages from their employees, selling shoddy products to their customers, or ravaging the earth.

“Don’t be like them,” Jesus tells his disciples. “When you give, don’t even let your left hand know what your right hand is doing. Do it in secret, and your Father who sees what is done in secret will reward you.”

Some pretenders have a religious bent. They want people to think they are holier, better, more pious. So they pray out loud on cable television, invoking the name of God to line their own pockets and fund their own lavish lifestyle, while the people they prey on can barely make ends meet. When they fast, as they sometimes do to show how truly superior they are, they parade their misery in front of the cameras, so everyone knows how self-sacrificial they are being, how Christian, how ascetic. They’ve already got what they want, the esteem and envy of the masses.

“Don’t be like them,” Jesus says. “Pray in an inner room away from the limelight. Don’t let anyone guess that you’re fasting. Comb your hair, put on your makeup, and use breath freshener, so no one knows you’re not eating. Then your Father, who sees what you are doing in secret, will reward you.”

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jesus law religion righteousness salvation sin spiritual life

Fulfilling the Law

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“Do not think that I have come to abolish the Law or the Prophets; I have not come to abolish them but to fulfill them. For truly I tell you, until heaven and earth disappear, not the smallest letter, not the least stroke of a pen, will by any means disappear from the Law until everything is accomplished.”

Matthew 5:17-18

One of the charges leveled at the early church—and indeed at Jesus himself—was that they taught people to ignore the demands of the Torah, referred to here as the Law and the Prophets. In the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus contrasts the behavior expected of his followers with the behavior demanded by the Law. He makes it clear at the outset that his intention is not to get rid of the Law or supersede it. Instead, he is going to fulfill the Law and the Prophets.

What does it mean to fulfill the Law and the Prophets?

Of course, the immediately obvious answer is that the Old Testament contains numerous references to a coming Messiah, so Jesus could be proclaiming himself to be that Messiah. But Jesus doesn’t refer only to prophecy. He refers also to Law, to the rules God gave through Moses for governing human behavior. He claims that he has come to fulfill those rules. What can it mean to fulfill the Law?

One of the repeated themes of the Old Testament is that no one is righteous. Paul summarizes it in Romans 3 where he quotes eight Old Testament passages about the universal depravity of human beings. No one, Paul claims, keeps the Law. Is it because the demands of the Law are too difficult to be kept? Is it because, as many of the poor in Jesus’ day apparently believed, only the wealthy can afford to meet the Law’s demands? Regardless the reasons, the Torah is clear that everyone is guilty of not keeping the Law.

Despite these warnings from the Torah, the Pharisees and religious leaders in Jesus’ day thought of themselves as keeping the Law. They were confident that by keeping the commandments and doing pious acts, they were meeting the requirements of the Law and would be saved. Jesus again and again exposed their hypocrisy and pointed out that they were deluding themselves. In fact, far from being righteous enough on their own merits, they were actually in worse shape than the “sinners” they so despised.

Jesus fulfilled the Law by keeping it, not as the Pharisees kept it by assiduously following the rules to the letter while gratifying their own lust and greed and desire for power. No, he kept it as it was intended: as a guide to loving God and other people. He kept it by doing good. In the end, he fulfilled the Law by meeting its demands for justice in his own body, a blameless, unblemished Lamb sacrificed for human beings’ inability to fulfill the Law on their own. To those who by trusting in him accept his sacrifice, he gives the ability by his Spirit to see him as he is and become like him, doing good wherever they go.

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